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Complex Reopening

Pontotoc County Complex will reopen Monday, June 8, 2020 to the public. Everyone entering is required to wear a mask.

Pontotoc County


Pontotoc County is in the south central part of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 37,492. Its county seat is Ada. The county was created at statehood from part of the Chickasaw Nation in Indian Territory. It was named for a historic Chickasaw tribal area in Mississippi. According to the Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture, Pontotoc is usually translated "cattail prairie" or "land of hanging grapes."

Pontotoc County comprises the Ada, OK Micropolitan Statistical Area.

The Chickasaw Nation's headquarters are in Ada.

The present Pontotoc County was part of the land that the U. S. government granted in 1830 to the Choctaw tribe via the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek. In 1837, the Chickasaw tribe was granted land within the Choctaw domain. In 1857, the Chickasaw Nation formed its own government on this land. However, few Chickasaw settled there until after the Civil War, mainly because of attacks by various Plains Indian tribes.

The first settlers were located in the vicinity of Boggy Depot during the 1840s. Camp Arbuckle was established to protect migrants traveling on the California Road. After the Civil War, settlements began spreading through the area. Some of the new settlers were illegal white intruders and outlaws. The first post office was established at Stonewall in 1878. The town of Ada was founded in 1890. After three railroads built lines through Ada, it became the dominant community of the area. Ada was named county seat when Pontotoc County was created. - Click here to read more

County Statistic
1907 founded in
Ada, OK Seat
38,224 Population /2017/
725sq/mi total area

What is County Government?

Counties are one of America's oldest forms of government, dating back to 1634 when the first county governments were established in Virginia. Ever since, county governments continue to evolve and adapt to changing responsibilities, environments and populations. Today, America's 3,069 county governments invest nearly $500 billion each year in local services and infrastructure and employ more than 3.3 million people. Most importantly, county governments are focused on the fundamental building blocks for healthy, safe, resilient and vibrant communities:

  • Maintain public records and coordinate elections
  • Support and maintain public infrastructure, transportation and economic development assets
  • Provide vital justice, law enforcement and public safety services
  • Protect the public's health and well-being, and
  • Implement a broad array of federal, state and local programs


No two counties are exactly the same. County governments are diverse in the ways we are structured and how we deliver services to our communities. The basic roles and responsibilities of our county governments are established by the states, including our legal, financial, program and policy authorities. Under "Dillon" rules, counties can only carry out duties and services specifically authorized by the state. Meanwhile, home rule or charter counties have more flexibility and authority.

In general, county governments are governed by a policy board of elected officials (often called county board, commission or council). Nationally, more than 19,300 individuals serve as elected county board members and elected executives. In addition, most counties also have a series of row officers or constitutional officers that are elected to serve, such as sheriffs, clerks, treasurers, auditors, public defenders, district attorneys and coroners.



With permission. Original Source Oklahoma State University, County Training Program


The present Pontotoc County was part of the land that the U. S. government granted in 1830 to the Choctaw tribe via the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek. In 1837, the Chickasaw tribe was granted land within the Choctaw domain. In 1857, the Chickasaw Nation formed its own government on this land. However, few Chickasaw settled there until after the Civil War, mainly because of attacks by various Plains Indian tribes.

The first settlers were located in the vicinity of Boggy Depot during the 1840s. Camp Arbuckle was established to protect migrants traveling on the California Road. After the Civil War, settlements began spreading through the area. Some of the new settlers were illegal white intruders and outlaws. The first post office was established at Stonewall in 1878. The town of Ada was founded in 1890. After three railroads built lines through Ada, it became the dominant community of the area. Ada was named county seat when Pontotoc County was created. - Click here to read more